In memory of
Ronald Lee Stevenson
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In memory of
Ronald Lee Stevenson
Ronald Lee Stevenson passed away peacefully in Portland, Oregon, on Feb. 22, 2019, with family by his side. He was 84. While Ron suffered from dementia for several years prior to his death, he still enjoyed singing and engaging with visitors and caregivers during that time. Ron was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1934 to Lewis "Steve" and Myrle Stevenson. Steve was a construction supervisor and the family relocated often for work during Ron's early childhood, eventually moving to vast spreads of land near the small eastern Colorado towns of Karvel and later Iliff where Steve was hired to manage a ranch and Myrle cooked meals for the ranch employees. The family later relocated to Sterling and eventually to Akron, Colorado, where Steve acquired a Chevrolet dealership. Ron was a good student and a notable athlete during his youth. He excelled in basketball, baseball and track and was quarterback for the Akron High School football team. He also ran track in college and was a sometime semi-pro baseball player. After high school, Ron attended the University of Colorado for a year where he used to sing at an establishment known as "The Sink." After his father's death, Ron joined the U.S. Air Force Cadet Program where he became a pilot and eventually instructed others to fly the signature training aircraft of the day, the single engine Piper Cub. Upon leaving the Air Force, Ron visited a friend at the University of Colorado. It was there that he met Hope Stevenson who would become his wife of 56 years and the mother of their two sons, Mark and Brian. Later, after pursuing a degree at the American Institute for Foreign Trade at Thunderbird University in Arizona, the young family moved to Chicago, Illinois, where Ron first worked for Continental Can and later co-founded and co-owned a chain of several RV and camping supply stores. The venture was a success but Ron felt professionally unfulfilled so he opted to sell his stake in the company and return to college in Colorado to earn a teaching degree. He was soon hired to teach in Eaton, a small rural community east of Colorado's Rocky Mountains. Ron taught economics and social studies for a number of years there before moving into administration, first as Eaton's high school principal and then as assistant superintendent. He became deeply embedded in the Eaton community, volunteering as the local Cub Scout master while his boys were active in the organization, and in civic organizations including the Elks Club, Lions Club and Soroptimist Club. Ron was active in Colorado politics too, serving as a precinct committee person, as a successful state senate candidate's campaign chair, and later running for state senate himself. While much of his time was devoted to the community, Ron still found time to pursue his personal interests which included reading, tennis, cooking, gardening and listening to music. He enjoyed camping and fishing with his family and traveled often with the family to Mexico where Hope had grown up and where her parents still lived. Hope worked as a teacher in Eaton, too, but her burgeoning side career as an artist brought her to a crossroads; she needed to relocate to a more viable art market if she wanted to paint full-time and achieve a greater level of commercial success. Ron encouraged Hope's career growth so despite their deep connection to Eaton, in 1989 the two moved to the scenic seaside town of Mendocino, California, where they lived and thrived for nearly two decades. While Hope made a name for herself in Mendocino's creative world, Ron worked for the school district in nearby Fort Bragg until his retirement. As he had done in Eaton, Ron became involved in his new community, taking writing classes at the local community college and writing regularly about politics and history. He helped establish and promote a well-regarded annual writers conference there that still thrives today. In 2008, with Hope suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and Ron recovering from a stroke, the couple made their final move to be closer to their sons, Mark and Brian, in Portland, Oregon. Even then, Ron found new interests to pursue. He was involved in his retirement community's periodic theater productions, took tap dancing lessons and sang to anyone who would listen or simply to himself. Ron is survived by his sons, Mark and Brian, and their respective wives, Mary and Karen; his sister, Lyn; his grandchildren, Riley, Will, and Keegan; step-granddaughter, Lauren; nieces Kelly and Kelli; and nephew, Kevin. In lieu of flowers, we know that Ron would appreciate any donations made to the Mendocino Writers Conference at http://mcwc.org/
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Services Provided By
A Special Touch Funeral & Cremation Service
11848 Dublin Blvd
Dublin, CA 94568
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In memory of
Ronald Lee Stevenson
Ronald Lee Stevenson passed away peacefully in Portland, Oregon, on Feb. 22, 2019, with family by his side. He was 84. While Ron suffered from dementia for several years prior to his death, he still enjoyed singing and engaging with visitors and caregivers during that time. Ron was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1934 to Lewis "Steve" and Myrle Stevenson. Steve was a construction supervisor and the family relocated often for work during Ron's early childhood, eventually moving to vast spreads of land near the small eastern Colorado towns of Karvel and later Iliff where Steve was hired to manage a ranch and Myrle cooked meals for the ranch employees. The family later relocated to Sterling and eventually to Akron, Colorado, where Steve acquired a Chevrolet dealership. Ron was a good student and a notable athlete during his youth. He excelled in basketball, baseball and track and was quarterback for the Akron High School football team. He also ran track in college and was a sometime semi-pro baseball player. After high school, Ron attended the University of Colorado for a year where he used to sing at an establishment known as "The Sink." After his father's death, Ron joined the U.S. Air Force Cadet Program where he became a pilot and eventually instructed others to fly the signature training aircraft of the day, the single engine Piper Cub. Upon leaving the Air Force, Ron visited a friend at the University of Colorado. It was there that he met Hope Stevenson who would become his wife of 56 years and the mother of their two sons, Mark and Brian. Later, after pursuing a degree at the American Institute for Foreign Trade at Thunderbird University in Arizona, the young family moved to Chicago, Illinois, where Ron first worked for Continental Can and later co-founded and co-owned a chain of several RV and camping supply stores. The venture was a success but Ron felt professionally unfulfilled so he opted to sell his stake in the company and return to college in Colorado to earn a teaching degree. He was soon hired to teach in Eaton, a small rural community east of Colorado's Rocky Mountains. Ron taught economics and social studies for a number of years there before moving into administration, first as Eaton's high school principal and then as assistant superintendent. He became deeply embedded in the Eaton community, volunteering as the local Cub Scout master while his boys were active in the organization, and in civic organizations including the Elks Club, Lions Club and Soroptimist Club. Ron was active in Colorado politics too, serving as a precinct committee person, as a successful state senate candidate's campaign chair, and later running for state senate himself. While much of his time was devoted to the community, Ron still found time to pursue his personal interests which included reading, tennis, cooking, gardening and listening to music. He enjoyed camping and fishing with his family and traveled often with the family to Mexico where Hope had grown up and where her parents still lived. Hope worked as a teacher in Eaton, too, but her burgeoning side career as an artist brought her to a crossroads; she needed to relocate to a more viable art market if she wanted to paint full-time and achieve a greater level of commercial success. Ron encouraged Hope's career growth so despite their deep connection to Eaton, in 1989 the two moved to the scenic seaside town of Mendocino, California, where they lived and thrived for nearly two decades. While Hope made a name for herself in Mendocino's creative world, Ron worked for the school district in nearby Fort Bragg until his retirement. As he had done in Eaton, Ron became involved in his new community, taking writing classes at the local community college and writing regularly about politics and history. He helped establish and promote a well-regarded annual writers conference there that still thrives today. In 2008, with Hope suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and Ron recovering from a stroke, the couple made their final move to be closer to their sons, Mark and Brian, in Portland, Oregon. Even then, Ron found new interests to pursue. He was involved in his retirement community's periodic theater productions, took tap dancing lessons and sang to anyone who would listen or simply to himself. Ron is survived by his sons, Mark and Brian, and their respective wives, Mary and Karen; his sister, Lyn; his grandchildren, Riley, Will, and Keegan; step-granddaughter, Lauren; nieces Kelly and Kelli; and nephew, Kevin. In lieu of flowers, we know that Ron would appreciate any donations made to the Mendocino Writers Conference at http://mcwc.org/
View Full Obituary ›
Services Provided By
A Special Touch Funeral & Cremation Service
11848 Dublin Blvd
Dublin, CA 94568
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