In memory of
William Richard Bartlett
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In memory of
William Richard Bartlett
WILLIAM RICHARD BARTLETT Always a part of the percussion discussion, Bill Bartlett died on August 30th at the age of 82, but the rhythm of his life echoes for so many who knew him. Bill was born in Export, PA on February 12, 1937. He graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in agriculture and worked on the family dairy farm for many years. The youngest of four, Bill followed his older brother, John, to Miami to work with Bartlett Construction. One of his many projects was a major renovation of the Miami International Airport. He loved deep sea fishing and proudly displayed a large marlin on the wall of his Miami home, but his greatest passion was jazz drumming. Bill is survived by his daughter, Heather Channing, granddaughter Kayleigh Channing, his partner of 40 years, Kay Montalbano and his eldest brother, former Congressman from Maryland, Roscoe Bartlett. Bill and Kay left Miami together after Hurricane Andrew in 1993 with their beloved Doberman, Jennifer, and a stray cat they rescued and called Miss Kitty. They left without knowing where they would stop, but found a new home in Wilmington, certain they were safe from hurricanes. Despite that minor miscalculation, Bill and Kay grew into the community, joining the Unitarian Universalist Church of Wilmington, and making many great friendships there. Bill found that he had an affinity for teaching and tutored students in various subjects for 10 years at the John D. Codington School. "Mr. Bill," was honored by the school as Volunteer of the Year and, as teacher Danielle Rayno said, "he just wanted to be there for the kids, and gave, expecting nothing in return." Bill was a lifelong jazz lover and spent countless hours drumming. Into his 80s, Bill would occasionally sit in for sessions with Benny Hill and others at the Burnt Mill Creek in Wilmington. He was passionate about wanting to keep the art of jazz alive, and ensuring everyone has access to hear it's beauty for many years to come. He could simply descend into the music and become one with it. Like Max Roach, his hands shimmered on the legs of rain. Bill was also a skilled tinkerer. He could and did build or fix anything. His garage is a masterpiece of gadgets and tools. He taught neighbors woodworking and helped with many carpentry projects at the Unitarian church. We are all so fortunate to have lived in a world with such a kind and colorful man. A memorial service will be held on September 21st at 2pm at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at 4313 Lake Avenue, Wilmington, NC, 28403. In lieu of flowers, please feel free to make a donation in Bill's name to: Cape Fear Jazz Society - https://capefearjazzsociety.org/ Codington Elementary School PTA - http://www.codingtonpta.org/
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In memory of
William Richard Bartlett
WILLIAM RICHARD BARTLETT Always a part of the percussion discussion, Bill Bartlett died on August 30th at the age of 82, but the rhythm of his life echoes for so many who knew him. Bill was born in Export, PA on February 12, 1937. He graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in agriculture and worked on the family dairy farm for many years. The youngest of four, Bill followed his older brother, John, to Miami to work with Bartlett Construction. One of his many projects was a major renovation of the Miami International Airport. He loved deep sea fishing and proudly displayed a large marlin on the wall of his Miami home, but his greatest passion was jazz drumming. Bill is survived by his daughter, Heather Channing, granddaughter Kayleigh Channing, his partner of 40 years, Kay Montalbano and his eldest brother, former Congressman from Maryland, Roscoe Bartlett. Bill and Kay left Miami together after Hurricane Andrew in 1993 with their beloved Doberman, Jennifer, and a stray cat they rescued and called Miss Kitty. They left without knowing where they would stop, but found a new home in Wilmington, certain they were safe from hurricanes. Despite that minor miscalculation, Bill and Kay grew into the community, joining the Unitarian Universalist Church of Wilmington, and making many great friendships there. Bill found that he had an affinity for teaching and tutored students in various subjects for 10 years at the John D. Codington School. "Mr. Bill," was honored by the school as Volunteer of the Year and, as teacher Danielle Rayno said, "he just wanted to be there for the kids, and gave, expecting nothing in return." Bill was a lifelong jazz lover and spent countless hours drumming. Into his 80s, Bill would occasionally sit in for sessions with Benny Hill and others at the Burnt Mill Creek in Wilmington. He was passionate about wanting to keep the art of jazz alive, and ensuring everyone has access to hear it's beauty for many years to come. He could simply descend into the music and become one with it. Like Max Roach, his hands shimmered on the legs of rain. Bill was also a skilled tinkerer. He could and did build or fix anything. His garage is a masterpiece of gadgets and tools. He taught neighbors woodworking and helped with many carpentry projects at the Unitarian church. We are all so fortunate to have lived in a world with such a kind and colorful man. A memorial service will be held on September 21st at 2pm at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at 4313 Lake Avenue, Wilmington, NC, 28403. In lieu of flowers, please feel free to make a donation in Bill's name to: Cape Fear Jazz Society - https://capefearjazzsociety.org/ Codington Elementary School PTA - http://www.codingtonpta.org/
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