In memory of
Martin M. Berman
In memory of
Martin M. Berman
Martin M. Berman Martin Morris Berman spoke his last words, one year ago, on March 25th, 2020, in his Palm Springs home, dying in the arms of his devoted wife Jacqueline Berman from Covid-19. Unveiling took place on March 25, 2021. Martin was born to Mollie Gelbert and Abe Berman in Los Angeles, California December 24th, 1934. He was the mistake that thrilled Phillip Berman, his older brother by 16 years, who predeceased Marty in death in 1972. Marty as he was called, was renowned as one of the United States most aggressive litigators, a generous philanthropist, and quite possibly, one of the greatest Trial Lawyers in American history. Martin Morris Berman, was a member of the American Board of Trial Lawyers, an Arbitrator with the Superior Court in Los Angeles, he was admitted as an Attorney with The US Supreme Court, and The Supreme Court of the State of California. He was admitted to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and inducted into the United States District Court Northern California. Martin entered USC law school night classes while he was working full time for NASA during the day as a chemical aerospace engineer in the Space program. Martin worked at Rocketdyne in Simi Valley, side-by-side with Wernher von Braun, the famous German Aerospace Architect. NASA brought Wernher to the US, to work with Martin who had developed a new jet propellant fuel that burned hotter in less time than previous experiments. These two engineers were tasked with building a Hydrogen -P generator to boost rockets with Martins formula of jet propulsion made from condensed matter. The US was determined to beat the Russians into outer space. Together, Martin and Wernher took the formula of liquid oxygen and hydrogen gas, that drove the pumps and boosted the thrust to propel rockets into Space. Martin sent up Astronauts Grisssom, Sheperd, Carpenter, and Schira on the Mercury Redstone. NASA beat the Russians into Space with the Redstone. Martin then sent up the Atlas and his formula sent up the Apollo. Martin met Astronaut Neil Armstrong, his alumni from USC who was also an aeronautical engineer. When Neil became the first person to walk on the moon, Neil sent Martin custom-made Matchbooks, commemorating the first man on the moon. Neil's name and date and logo with a character of an astronaut walking on the moon was imprinted on the cover. Neil sent Martin a handwritten thank you note with a dozen matchbooks, despite Martin had never smoked in his life. Martin preserved the matches with all his memorabilia from the Redstone, Atlas and Apollo ships, over three eras of space entry. Martin wrote in his little calendars that all six of the astronauts smoked and Wally chain-smoked, walking with a cigarette in his mouth onto the launch pad ready to board the Redstone! Martin kept four of the O-Rings that sit in the missile engines and had them made into bookends. These are the same designed O-rings that caused the Challenger to explode in 1986, 73 seconds after lift-off. Martin was an expert on the O-rings failing in cold or hot temperature changes. Martin was testing a rocket in the pit at Rocketdyne, when the very O-rings designed by NASA, caught the ship on fire. Martin hit the alarm bells and jumped into the pit and remained blasting the fire until his helmet melted. The heat burned his retina in one eye. Martin wrote in his journal, that the fire extinguishers he was using, could not put out a space fire as this fire was burning hotter and with less oxygen than a fire burns on earth. Martin did not run until he believed hundreds of employees had time to escape. When Martin could no longer take the heat, he ran out the door just ahead of the Rocketdyne Plant exploding. The sound from the blast cost him partial loss of hearing in one ear. He learned one employee did not make it out of the plant and died. Martin grieved for that man's life, despite him being a hero and saving hundreds of lives that day. Martin decided it was time to change careers. Jacqueline has arranged to donate all of Martins' one-of-a-kind space artifacts to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Martin also taught a yearly seminar at USC, that he named Trial Practice for the graduating Law class, his last seminar taught in 2018. Martin was a Regent and a Trojan Fanatic his entire life. Martin was voted Trial Lawyer of the Year by Los Angeles County Trial Lawyers, and Riverside County Trial Lawyers from 1983 up to 2019. Martin achieved an AV rating from Martindale-Hubbell as the highest rated Medical Malpractice Trial Attorney honored for the highest level of professional excellence. Martin was voted and received the Best Attorney of the Year in Medical Malpractice, consecutively from 2000 to present, published in Palm Springs Life and in Best Lawyers. Martin represented plaintiffs suing the VA and the US Government, full contingency. He never took a dime unless he won. Martin had a 98 percent score winning his Trials. Martin was loved by all his clients, particularly the families of his clients who contracted AIDS and died from a blood transfusion sold to the hospitals by the American Red Cross. Martin Berman's most famous Trial was aired on every News and primetime talk show on TV at the time of this victory; and told in the book And The Band Played On written by Randy Shilts. Shilts captured Martins closing argument in Trial against the AMRC, when the US Attorney told the jury the chance of contracting AIDS from a Red Cross blood transfusion was one in a million. Martin put his expert witness the head of the CDC, Dr. Donald Francis on the witness stand. Dr. Frances had discovered Ebola and found the cure for Ebola. On direct questioning by Martin, Dr. Francis was asked the statistics on contracting AIDS from an AMRC blood transfusion. Dr. Francis testified the CDC showed the risk of contracting AIDS from AMRC blood, was one in fifty in San Francisco and one in one hundred in Los Angeles. The book became the movie And The Band Played On with Alan Alda and a stellar cast. The movie is now an LGBT classic and can still be watched on Cable. Randy Shilts gifted Martin the first printing of his book fresh off the St. Martin's Press, and he inscribed the book Marty…You surpass Helen of Troy, Forever Grateful Randy. Shilts died from AIDS. Author Judith Reitman then contacted Martin and he contributed to her work writing her book Bad Blood Crisis in the American Red Cross. Jude as she went by, also gifted Marty the First Print off the Kensington Press inscribed: To Marty Berman, With many thanks for your help, Best of Luck, Jude Reitman 1996. Martins tenacity in the courtroom held a win record for 98% in State and Federal Trials. Martin preferred to represent our Military and Veterans of War and their dependents, successfully suing negligent doctors working at the VA. Martin contributed his win record in Trial to his youth playing tennis. He proclaimed the win was not because of his tennis skills, but in his warming up, and hitting balls one hour before his game. Martin believed that the tennis warmups trained him to take the time to prepare his cases properly before each Trial. Martin went on to obtain his Juris Doctorate from USC in June 1962, graduating magna cum laude. Years later, in addition to a full-time law practice, he taught college-level courses at night at Glendale University College of Law. Martin was born and raised in Boyle Heights in E. LA, the son of a produce man who made ends meet, but not enough to pay for College. Martin attended Dorsey High School and graduated top of his class. He was awarded a Tennis Scholarship to USC for his undergraduate majoring in Chemical Engineering. He was also chosen by the President of USC, to accompany Senator John F Kennedy on a tour of the USC Campus and conclude the tour with a private lunch. Martin was a registered Republican and he did not allow his party affiliation to cloud his admiration and respect for Senator Kennedy. John F. Kennedy exceeded his time allotted for his visit at USC, telling his security to just wait he was not ready to leave. The Senator was deeply engrossed in his tour guide asking Martin questions about his childhood and how he learned to play tennis and afford the clothes and rackets and at the same time was also hitting the books and was always top of his class? Martin shared with his wife Jacqueline, that he responded to Senator Kennedy's question exclaiming he just knew he had to keep climbing in life, as a finish to anything would end his motivation. Senator Kennedy asked Martin to call him if he ever visited Massachusetts. Martin never "Party Affiliated" again, and from his meeting with JFK, he chose the person best qualified for the job. Martin voted for a democratic candidate, John F. Kennedy for President. Martins last words were in reply to Jacqueline lying next to him when she told Martin "I love you" and he was able to say back "I love you more". Martin leaves behind his adored wife Jacqueline, and his three sons by his first marriage, Adam Berman in SF, Cary Berman and Mark Berman in LA, his stepdaughter he raised, Tamar Brett Mercier of Palm Springs, and his favorite person on the planet…whom he loved to the Heavens and back as they used to say to each other…his little grandson Christian Alexander Mercier. Memorial will be held June 22nd 2021, Maui Hawaii, Kaanapali Shores (COVID-19 permitting). This is the island that has been their favorite place and frequent hideaway two to three times a year since 1979. The gathering will be held on the grounds of the Sheraton Kaanapali, in hope that Covid has been eradicated enough that it will be safe to travel. Jacqueline Berman has requested that in these tragic terrifying times, in memory of Martin M Berman, do not send material matter. Instead, please honor Martin M. Berman's life, by picking up your phone and calling somebody you know that you have lost touch. Tell them you are thinking about them and you are there for them and make them smile. Special thanks to Dr. William Longfellow who always took a call on his cell phone from all his patients, and who arranged for Martin to remain in his home with his wife until the end. Lastly, it is Jacqueline's wish that all who read Martin M Berman's journey in this Life…Wear your masks, and Hold Your Loved Ones Tight.
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In memory of
Martin M. Berman
Martin M. Berman Martin Morris Berman spoke his last words, one year ago, on March 25th, 2020, in his Palm Springs home, dying in the arms of his devoted wife Jacqueline Berman from Covid-19. Unveiling took place on March 25, 2021. Martin was born to Mollie Gelbert and Abe Berman in Los Angeles, California December 24th, 1934. He was the mistake that thrilled Phillip Berman, his older brother by 16 years, who predeceased Marty in death in 1972. Marty as he was called, was renowned as one of the United States most aggressive litigators, a generous philanthropist, and quite possibly, one of the greatest Trial Lawyers in American history. Martin Morris Berman, was a member of the American Board of Trial Lawyers, an Arbitrator with the Superior Court in Los Angeles, he was admitted as an Attorney with The US Supreme Court, and The Supreme Court of the State of California. He was admitted to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and inducted into the United States District Court Northern California. Martin entered USC law school night classes while he was working full time for NASA during the day as a chemical aerospace engineer in the Space program. Martin worked at Rocketdyne in Simi Valley, side-by-side with Wernher von Braun, the famous German Aerospace Architect. NASA brought Wernher to the US, to work with Martin who had developed a new jet propellant fuel that burned hotter in less time than previous experiments. These two engineers were tasked with building a Hydrogen -P generator to boost rockets with Martins formula of jet propulsion made from condensed matter. The US was determined to beat the Russians into outer space. Together, Martin and Wernher took the formula of liquid oxygen and hydrogen gas, that drove the pumps and boosted the thrust to propel rockets into Space. Martin sent up Astronauts Grisssom, Sheperd, Carpenter, and Schira on the Mercury Redstone. NASA beat the Russians into Space with the Redstone. Martin then sent up the Atlas and his formula sent up the Apollo. Martin met Astronaut Neil Armstrong, his alumni from USC who was also an aeronautical engineer. When Neil became the first person to walk on the moon, Neil sent Martin custom-made Matchbooks, commemorating the first man on the moon. Neil's name and date and logo with a character of an astronaut walking on the moon was imprinted on the cover. Neil sent Martin a handwritten thank you note with a dozen matchbooks, despite Martin had never smoked in his life. Martin preserved the matches with all his memorabilia from the Redstone, Atlas and Apollo ships, over three eras of space entry. Martin wrote in his little calendars that all six of the astronauts smoked and Wally chain-smoked, walking with a cigarette in his mouth onto the launch pad ready to board the Redstone! Martin kept four of the O-Rings that sit in the missile engines and had them made into bookends. These are the same designed O-rings that caused the Challenger to explode in 1986, 73 seconds after lift-off. Martin was an expert on the O-rings failing in cold or hot temperature changes. Martin was testing a rocket in the pit at Rocketdyne, when the very O-rings designed by NASA, caught the ship on fire. Martin hit the alarm bells and jumped into the pit and remained blasting the fire until his helmet melted. The heat burned his retina in one eye. Martin wrote in his journal, that the fire extinguishers he was using, could not put out a space fire as this fire was burning hotter and with less oxygen than a fire burns on earth. Martin did not run until he believed hundreds of employees had time to escape. When Martin could no longer take the heat, he ran out the door just ahead of the Rocketdyne Plant exploding. The sound from the blast cost him partial loss of hearing in one ear. He learned one employee did not make it out of the plant and died. Martin grieved for that man's life, despite him being a hero and saving hundreds of lives that day. Martin decided it was time to change careers. Jacqueline has arranged to donate all of Martins' one-of-a-kind space artifacts to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Martin also taught a yearly seminar at USC, that he named Trial Practice for the graduating Law class, his last seminar taught in 2018. Martin was a Regent and a Trojan Fanatic his entire life. Martin was voted Trial Lawyer of the Year by Los Angeles County Trial Lawyers, and Riverside County Trial Lawyers from 1983 up to 2019. Martin achieved an AV rating from Martindale-Hubbell as the highest rated Medical Malpractice Trial Attorney honored for the highest level of professional excellence. Martin was voted and received the Best Attorney of the Year in Medical Malpractice, consecutively from 2000 to present, published in Palm Springs Life and in Best Lawyers. Martin represented plaintiffs suing the VA and the US Government, full contingency. He never took a dime unless he won. Martin had a 98 percent score winning his Trials. Martin was loved by all his clients, particularly the families of his clients who contracted AIDS and died from a blood transfusion sold to the hospitals by the American Red Cross. Martin Berman's most famous Trial was aired on every News and primetime talk show on TV at the time of this victory; and told in the book And The Band Played On written by Randy Shilts. Shilts captured Martins closing argument in Trial against the AMRC, when the US Attorney told the jury the chance of contracting AIDS from a Red Cross blood transfusion was one in a million. Martin put his expert witness the head of the CDC, Dr. Donald Francis on the witness stand. Dr. Frances had discovered Ebola and found the cure for Ebola. On direct questioning by Martin, Dr. Francis was asked the statistics on contracting AIDS from an AMRC blood transfusion. Dr. Francis testified the CDC showed the risk of contracting AIDS from AMRC blood, was one in fifty in San Francisco and one in one hundred in Los Angeles. The book became the movie And The Band Played On with Alan Alda and a stellar cast. The movie is now an LGBT classic and can still be watched on Cable. Randy Shilts gifted Martin the first printing of his book fresh off the St. Martin's Press, and he inscribed the book Marty…You surpass Helen of Troy, Forever Grateful Randy. Shilts died from AIDS. Author Judith Reitman then contacted Martin and he contributed to her work writing her book Bad Blood Crisis in the American Red Cross. Jude as she went by, also gifted Marty the First Print off the Kensington Press inscribed: To Marty Berman, With many thanks for your help, Best of Luck, Jude Reitman 1996. Martins tenacity in the courtroom held a win record for 98% in State and Federal Trials. Martin preferred to represent our Military and Veterans of War and their dependents, successfully suing negligent doctors working at the VA. Martin contributed his win record in Trial to his youth playing tennis. He proclaimed the win was not because of his tennis skills, but in his warming up, and hitting balls one hour before his game. Martin believed that the tennis warmups trained him to take the time to prepare his cases properly before each Trial. Martin went on to obtain his Juris Doctorate from USC in June 1962, graduating magna cum laude. Years later, in addition to a full-time law practice, he taught college-level courses at night at Glendale University College of Law. Martin was born and raised in Boyle Heights in E. LA, the son of a produce man who made ends meet, but not enough to pay for College. Martin attended Dorsey High School and graduated top of his class. He was awarded a Tennis Scholarship to USC for his undergraduate majoring in Chemical Engineering. He was also chosen by the President of USC, to accompany Senator John F Kennedy on a tour of the USC Campus and conclude the tour with a private lunch. Martin was a registered Republican and he did not allow his party affiliation to cloud his admiration and respect for Senator Kennedy. John F. Kennedy exceeded his time allotted for his visit at USC, telling his security to just wait he was not ready to leave. The Senator was deeply engrossed in his tour guide asking Martin questions about his childhood and how he learned to play tennis and afford the clothes and rackets and at the same time was also hitting the books and was always top of his class? Martin shared with his wife Jacqueline, that he responded to Senator Kennedy's question exclaiming he just knew he had to keep climbing in life, as a finish to anything would end his motivation. Senator Kennedy asked Martin to call him if he ever visited Massachusetts. Martin never "Party Affiliated" again, and from his meeting with JFK, he chose the person best qualified for the job. Martin voted for a democratic candidate, John F. Kennedy for President. Martins last words were in reply to Jacqueline lying next to him when she told Martin "I love you" and he was able to say back "I love you more". Martin leaves behind his adored wife Jacqueline, and his three sons by his first marriage, Adam Berman in SF, Cary Berman and Mark Berman in LA, his stepdaughter he raised, Tamar Brett Mercier of Palm Springs, and his favorite person on the planet…whom he loved to the Heavens and back as they used to say to each other…his little grandson Christian Alexander Mercier. Memorial will be held June 22nd 2021, Maui Hawaii, Kaanapali Shores (COVID-19 permitting). This is the island that has been their favorite place and frequent hideaway two to three times a year since 1979. The gathering will be held on the grounds of the Sheraton Kaanapali, in hope that Covid has been eradicated enough that it will be safe to travel. Jacqueline Berman has requested that in these tragic terrifying times, in memory of Martin M Berman, do not send material matter. Instead, please honor Martin M. Berman's life, by picking up your phone and calling somebody you know that you have lost touch. Tell them you are thinking about them and you are there for them and make them smile. Special thanks to Dr. William Longfellow who always took a call on his cell phone from all his patients, and who arranged for Martin to remain in his home with his wife until the end. Lastly, it is Jacqueline's wish that all who read Martin M Berman's journey in this Life…Wear your masks, and Hold Your Loved Ones Tight.
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