In memory of
Gordon C. Sage
In memory of
Gordon C. Sage
GORDON C. SAGE My father, Gordon C. Sage, was born Oct. 21, 1921, and raised on a small ranch near the foot of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota. This picturesque resort area endowed him with a lifelong love of wildlife, nature and scenic beauty. It was here that he acquired an intimate knowledge of nature. At a very young age, it became evident that he was born with the natural ability to take that knowledge and turn it into artistic masterpieces. September 1939, his senior year, Hitler’s troops invaded Poland. He decided to join the National Guard to help guard his country. Graduating from Rapid City High School in 1940, he made another decision ... he felt it was his duty to his country, he switched to the U.S. Marine Corps. He hitchhiked to the recruiting center in Minneapolis, MN. Gordon was soon sent to boot camp at Camp Pendleton near San Diego, CA, assigned to a seagoing Marine unit. At age 20, he was assigned to Rear Admiral Walter Stratton Anderson on the USS Maryland, as his orderly. Admiral Anderson was the commander of the battleship fleet in the Pacific Theater. On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese war planes struck, and Gordon started hearing explosions. A friend came to his door and said, “this is it” ... Pearl Harbor was being bombed. The bay was on fire and the flames were right up against the ship. He jumped in a line and started passing ammunition to an antiaircraft gun until the admiral came aboard. The Maryland was struck with three blows but spared heavy damage. The ship crippled out of the harbor and went to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, WA, for repairs. In Seattle, he met the love of his life, Patricia Decker and they were married. He returned to active duty and participated in the landing of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands, fighting on the Marshall Islands, the Mariana Islands of Guam Saipan, Tinian, then on to the landing of Iwo Jima. After World War II, Gordon went to art school for awhile then re-enlisted in the Army-Air Corps. He chose the Air Force when the branches separated. He kept close ties with art by serving as an illustrator in the military, painting in his spare time. Gordon put in another 20 years of teaching in the Evergreen School District in Clark County, WA, where he had called home for 58 years. He spent his life exploring the potential of oil paint with all it richness and variety of texture. Gordon Sage was a versatile and prolific artist, the greater part of his output consists of Native American themes, encompassing native myths, customs and dress. The rest of his work is comprised of landscapes, wildlife, portraits, allegory and literary themes. Most of his work created in the last 20 years has been painted with a palette knife. His formal art training began at Colorado Springs Fine Art Center where he studied under Boardman Robinson. Later, Gordon graduated from Arizona State University and received his masters degree from Lewis and Clark College in Portland, OR. Gordon had shown and sold to collectors in Japan, France, South Dakota, Arizona, California, Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. He is survived by his daughter, Donna G. Sage; son-in-law, Ray B. Bailey; grandsons, Shane Bird and wife Deborah, Wade Bird and partner, John, and Ryan Bird and wife, Tracy; great-granddaughters, Payton, Trisha and Jessica; great-grandsons, Tee Jay and Spencer; great-great-grandsons, Colton, Logan and Geddy; and great-great-granddaughter, Haley; step-great-grandsons, Chris, Brandon, step-great-granddaughter, Alex, and surrogate granddaughter, Susannah. Plus many dear family members and friends. Preceding him in death was wife, Patricia; granddaughter, Carmel; and step-grandson, Brian. Graveside service is Nov. 25, at 11 a.m. “Wilson Bridge Cemetery” on 72nd Avenue. Please share a memory @ www.columbian.com/obits
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Past Services ╲╱
In memory of
Gordon C. Sage
GORDON C. SAGE My father, Gordon C. Sage, was born Oct. 21, 1921, and raised on a small ranch near the foot of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota. This picturesque resort area endowed him with a lifelong love of wildlife, nature and scenic beauty. It was here that he acquired an intimate knowledge of nature. At a very young age, it became evident that he was born with the natural ability to take that knowledge and turn it into artistic masterpieces. September 1939, his senior year, Hitler’s troops invaded Poland. He decided to join the National Guard to help guard his country. Graduating from Rapid City High School in 1940, he made another decision ... he felt it was his duty to his country, he switched to the U.S. Marine Corps. He hitchhiked to the recruiting center in Minneapolis, MN. Gordon was soon sent to boot camp at Camp Pendleton near San Diego, CA, assigned to a seagoing Marine unit. At age 20, he was assigned to Rear Admiral Walter Stratton Anderson on the USS Maryland, as his orderly. Admiral Anderson was the commander of the battleship fleet in the Pacific Theater. On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese war planes struck, and Gordon started hearing explosions. A friend came to his door and said, “this is it” ... Pearl Harbor was being bombed. The bay was on fire and the flames were right up against the ship. He jumped in a line and started passing ammunition to an antiaircraft gun until the admiral came aboard. The Maryland was struck with three blows but spared heavy damage. The ship crippled out of the harbor and went to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, WA, for repairs. In Seattle, he met the love of his life, Patricia Decker and they were married. He returned to active duty and participated in the landing of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands, fighting on the Marshall Islands, the Mariana Islands of Guam Saipan, Tinian, then on to the landing of Iwo Jima. After World War II, Gordon went to art school for awhile then re-enlisted in the Army-Air Corps. He chose the Air Force when the branches separated. He kept close ties with art by serving as an illustrator in the military, painting in his spare time. Gordon put in another 20 years of teaching in the Evergreen School District in Clark County, WA, where he had called home for 58 years. He spent his life exploring the potential of oil paint with all it richness and variety of texture. Gordon Sage was a versatile and prolific artist, the greater part of his output consists of Native American themes, encompassing native myths, customs and dress. The rest of his work is comprised of landscapes, wildlife, portraits, allegory and literary themes. Most of his work created in the last 20 years has been painted with a palette knife. His formal art training began at Colorado Springs Fine Art Center where he studied under Boardman Robinson. Later, Gordon graduated from Arizona State University and received his masters degree from Lewis and Clark College in Portland, OR. Gordon had shown and sold to collectors in Japan, France, South Dakota, Arizona, California, Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. He is survived by his daughter, Donna G. Sage; son-in-law, Ray B. Bailey; grandsons, Shane Bird and wife Deborah, Wade Bird and partner, John, and Ryan Bird and wife, Tracy; great-granddaughters, Payton, Trisha and Jessica; great-grandsons, Tee Jay and Spencer; great-great-grandsons, Colton, Logan and Geddy; and great-great-granddaughter, Haley; step-great-grandsons, Chris, Brandon, step-great-granddaughter, Alex, and surrogate granddaughter, Susannah. Plus many dear family members and friends. Preceding him in death was wife, Patricia; granddaughter, Carmel; and step-grandson, Brian. Graveside service is Nov. 25, at 11 a.m. “Wilson Bridge Cemetery” on 72nd Avenue. Please share a memory @ www.columbian.com/obits
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Past Services ╲╱
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