In memory of
Barbara Jean Meadows
In memory of
Barbara Jean Meadows
Meadows, Barbara Jean 10/1/1933 - 4/23/2020 Ann Arbor, Michigan "To whom much is given, much is expected" "We make a living by what we get, but make a life by what we give" These values were consistently exemplified in thought, word and deed by the remarkable life of Barbara Jean (Evans) Meadows. Born October 1, 1933 in Albion, Michigan Barbara was the third of four children born to Rev. Alexander D. Evans and Eloise Boggs Evans. The family lived in Inkster, Michigan before moving to Ann Arbor in 1946 when her father assumed the pastorate of Bethel A.M.E. Church. Barbara fondly remembered that as a young girl she enjoyed accompanying her father on the piano as he performed weddings and funeral services for his members. Barbara attended Jones School and Ann Arbor High School before the family relocated to Detroit where she graduated from Northern High School. While attending Talladega College in Alabama, Barbara met and fell in love with a promising fellow student by the name of Theodore R. Meadows. They graduated with a plan for marriage and a promise to support each other in the pursuit of their educational and career goals. Barbara attended Smith College and received a master's degree in Social Work while Theodore enlisted in the United States Air Force. Barbara and Ted moved to Ann Arbor in 1959 where she worked as a psychiatric social worker while he attended and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School. They ultimately chose to make Ann Arbor their permanent home as they continued their careers and raised their family. To their union of 49 years, two children were born, Deborah and Thomas Randolph. Barbara served for many years as a social worker for the Ann Arbor Public Schools where she greatly impacted the lives of children and families, especially those who were often underserved and overlooked. Barbara found enrichment in serving our community through participation in numerous civic and cultural organizations as either a member, President, Chair, Trustee, or Founder. She was a Charter member of the Ann Arbor Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. as well as the Ann Arbor (MI) Chapter of The Links, Inc. Along with fellow Trustees Willis Patterson and Joe Dulin, she was a founding member of the African American Endowment Fund which provides grants for health, education and cultural programs in the African-American community. She also created the Ted & Barbara Meadows Endowment Fund to support grants made by the African American Endowment Fund. She was a life member of the National Alliance of Black School Educators, as well as the NAACP, and served as a member or trustee on the Boards of the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation, the African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw, Peace Neighborhood Center, Huron Services for Youth, the University Musical Society, Lurie Terrace Senior Housing, the Washtenaw Community College Foundation, the Ann Arbor Community Center, Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, the Washtenaw County United Negro College Fund and was appointed to the City of Ann Arbor Human Relations Commission in the 1960s. Barbara utilized her passion and talents to organize, mentor, advise, and advocate for the betterment of her family, culture, and community and, in acknowledgement of such, was the recipient of numerous awards including; the Ann Arbor Public Schools Apple Award, Peace Neighborhood Center Nelson Mandela Award, the Washtenaw Community College Recognition Award. She was selected as a Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Woman of Achievement, was a finalist for the Ann Arbor News Citizen of the Year in 2002 and, along with her husband, was awarded the Washtenaw County UNCF Eugene Power Award in 2000. Barbara steadfastly believed it was her duty to do God's will through unselfish acts of love and kindness and these efforts made her life full and meaningful. She could often be found fixing meals for the sick or seniors living alone, shopping for clothes or providing resources to support the educational and career goals of college students living away from home, and arranging for service workers and young people to attend one-of-a-kind performances with the support of Ken Fisher and the University Musical Society. For many, these performances were the first they had ever attended and their excitement fueled Barbara's passion to expose young people and people of color to the Arts. Her acts of service were both deliberate and intentional and reflected her belief that positively impacting the lives of others and sharing one's resources were the "rent we pay for the privilege of living on this earth'. It is impossible to know how many individuals have been blessed by her presence in their lives but it was Barbara's sincere hope that any blessing she bestowed upon someone would be passed along to bless somebody else. She earnestly believed that being responsible for each other was the only way to truly improve the world in which we live. Barbara loved family gatherings, cooking, political discussions, the Arts, and singing for over thirty years in the Our Own Thing Chorale under the leadership of founder Dr. Willis Patterson. She was thrilled the Chorale continues its legacy under the direction of one of her dearest mentees, Darnell Ishmel. According to her wishes, there will be no service as Barbara believed in smelling her roses while she lived and wished no fanfare or fuss upon her passing. She left this world as gracefully as she lived it and for this we are eternally grateful. Her memory will be forever cherished by her brother, Marvin Evans; children, Deborah Meadows, (Charles K Campbell), Thomas "Randy" (Linda) Meadows, and Dr. Dorian Moore; her granddaughter, Sydney Moore-Padgett; brother-in-law, Harold (Gustoria) Meadows; nephews, Dante Evans, Michael Evans, David Evans; niece, Cathy Evans; cousins, Geoffrey Craig and Olivia Boggs; and a host of loving family, friends and a grateful community. In lieu of flowers, Barbara wished for donations to be sent to: The African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw https://www.aachm.org/online-donation The African American Endowment Fund https://www.iphiview.com/aaacf/GivingOpportunities/OnlineDonation/tabid/542/dispatch/contribution_id$10240_hash$33604411246f4be78b5bd72e11a50a8c0a4ac2d0/Default.aspx Peace Neighborhood Center https://peaceneighborhoodcenter.org/memorial-donation/ The Our Own Thing Chorale https://ourownthing.org/donate
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opt312: Original
In memory of
Barbara Jean Meadows
Meadows, Barbara Jean 10/1/1933 - 4/23/2020 Ann Arbor, Michigan "To whom much is given, much is expected" "We make a living by what we get, but make a life by what we give" These values were consistently exemplified in thought, word and deed by the remarkable life of Barbara Jean (Evans) Meadows. Born October 1, 1933 in Albion, Michigan Barbara was the third of four children born to Rev. Alexander D. Evans and Eloise Boggs Evans. The family lived in Inkster, Michigan before moving to Ann Arbor in 1946 when her father assumed the pastorate of Bethel A.M.E. Church. Barbara fondly remembered that as a young girl she enjoyed accompanying her father on the piano as he performed weddings and funeral services for his members. Barbara attended Jones School and Ann Arbor High School before the family relocated to Detroit where she graduated from Northern High School. While attending Talladega College in Alabama, Barbara met and fell in love with a promising fellow student by the name of Theodore R. Meadows. They graduated with a plan for marriage and a promise to support each other in the pursuit of their educational and career goals. Barbara attended Smith College and received a master's degree in Social Work while Theodore enlisted in the United States Air Force. Barbara and Ted moved to Ann Arbor in 1959 where she worked as a psychiatric social worker while he attended and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School. They ultimately chose to make Ann Arbor their permanent home as they continued their careers and raised their family. To their union of 49 years, two children were born, Deborah and Thomas Randolph. Barbara served for many years as a social worker for the Ann Arbor Public Schools where she greatly impacted the lives of children and families, especially those who were often underserved and overlooked. Barbara found enrichment in serving our community through participation in numerous civic and cultural organizations as either a member, President, Chair, Trustee, or Founder. She was a Charter member of the Ann Arbor Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. as well as the Ann Arbor (MI) Chapter of The Links, Inc. Along with fellow Trustees Willis Patterson and Joe Dulin, she was a founding member of the African American Endowment Fund which provides grants for health, education and cultural programs in the African-American community. She also created the Ted & Barbara Meadows Endowment Fund to support grants made by the African American Endowment Fund. She was a life member of the National Alliance of Black School Educators, as well as the NAACP, and served as a member or trustee on the Boards of the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation, the African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw, Peace Neighborhood Center, Huron Services for Youth, the University Musical Society, Lurie Terrace Senior Housing, the Washtenaw Community College Foundation, the Ann Arbor Community Center, Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, the Washtenaw County United Negro College Fund and was appointed to the City of Ann Arbor Human Relations Commission in the 1960s. Barbara utilized her passion and talents to organize, mentor, advise, and advocate for the betterment of her family, culture, and community and, in acknowledgement of such, was the recipient of numerous awards including; the Ann Arbor Public Schools Apple Award, Peace Neighborhood Center Nelson Mandela Award, the Washtenaw Community College Recognition Award. She was selected as a Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Woman of Achievement, was a finalist for the Ann Arbor News Citizen of the Year in 2002 and, along with her husband, was awarded the Washtenaw County UNCF Eugene Power Award in 2000. Barbara steadfastly believed it was her duty to do God's will through unselfish acts of love and kindness and these efforts made her life full and meaningful. She could often be found fixing meals for the sick or seniors living alone, shopping for clothes or providing resources to support the educational and career goals of college students living away from home, and arranging for service workers and young people to attend one-of-a-kind performances with the support of Ken Fisher and the University Musical Society. For many, these performances were the first they had ever attended and their excitement fueled Barbara's passion to expose young people and people of color to the Arts. Her acts of service were both deliberate and intentional and reflected her belief that positively impacting the lives of others and sharing one's resources were the "rent we pay for the privilege of living on this earth'. It is impossible to know how many individuals have been blessed by her presence in their lives but it was Barbara's sincere hope that any blessing she bestowed upon someone would be passed along to bless somebody else. She earnestly believed that being responsible for each other was the only way to truly improve the world in which we live. Barbara loved family gatherings, cooking, political discussions, the Arts, and singing for over thirty years in the Our Own Thing Chorale under the leadership of founder Dr. Willis Patterson. She was thrilled the Chorale continues its legacy under the direction of one of her dearest mentees, Darnell Ishmel. According to her wishes, there will be no service as Barbara believed in smelling her roses while she lived and wished no fanfare or fuss upon her passing. She left this world as gracefully as she lived it and for this we are eternally grateful. Her memory will be forever cherished by her brother, Marvin Evans; children, Deborah Meadows, (Charles K Campbell), Thomas "Randy" (Linda) Meadows, and Dr. Dorian Moore; her granddaughter, Sydney Moore-Padgett; brother-in-law, Harold (Gustoria) Meadows; nephews, Dante Evans, Michael Evans, David Evans; niece, Cathy Evans; cousins, Geoffrey Craig and Olivia Boggs; and a host of loving family, friends and a grateful community. In lieu of flowers, Barbara wished for donations to be sent to: The African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw https://www.aachm.org/online-donation The African American Endowment Fund https://www.iphiview.com/aaacf/GivingOpportunities/OnlineDonation/tabid/542/dispatch/contribution_id$10240_hash$33604411246f4be78b5bd72e11a50a8c0a4ac2d0/Default.aspx Peace Neighborhood Center https://peaceneighborhoodcenter.org/memorial-donation/ The Our Own Thing Chorale https://ourownthing.org/donate
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