In memory of
Barrie Gilbert
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In memory of
Barrie Gilbert
Barrie Gilbert June 5, 1937 - Jan. 30, 2020 Barrie Gilbert of Beaverton died Jan. 30, 2020 at St. Vincent Hospital from a traumatic brain injury following a fall at home. Barrie was born June 5, 1937, to Fredrick Arthur and Edith (Tansley) Gilbert in Bournemouth, Dorset, England. His father died in a bombing attack when Barrie was three years old. By age 9, he had started experimenting with electronic circuits. Oscilloscopes had a special fascination to him. At 17 he had his first job in electronics and later studied physics at Bournemouth College. While working at Mullard in 1959 he saw a Tektronix oscilloscope for the first time. He was inspired to design his own oscilloscope which led him to a job at Tektronix in Oregon. He became a very creative circuit designer. In December 1968 he astonished the electronics community with two groundbreaking articles in one issue of the prestigious IEEE Journal. The subject of the two articles became known as the Translinear Principle. He moved back to England to care for his aging mother for seven years until her death. While in England Barrie worked with Analog Devices of Norwood, Mass. When he returned to the United States in 1977 he rejoined Tektronix out of his love for Oregon as much as for Tektronix. Analog Devices found him so valuable that it was willing to create a laboratory for Barrie in Oregon where his creativity exploded contributing to Analog Device's rapid growth. Since then Analog Devices NW Labs has grown to 21 employees and Barrie Gilbert has become one of the most famous analog circuit designers in the world. Barrie met his future wife, Alicia Moore, at an electronics conference in 1988 and they were married May 6, 1990. Barrie's prolific career earned him the Fall 2007 cover and two thirds of the prestigious IEEE Solid State Circuits News. He has been granted 109 U.S. Patents, numerous accolades and awards including an honorary PhD from Oregon State University. Barrie rearranged sonatas for orchestra or wind ensemble on his synthesizers, wrote poetry and had a collection of museum-class electronics. Barrie is survived by his wife of 30 years, Alicia; former wife, Myrna; four children, David (Wanda) of Gaston, Timothy of Bend, Lynn (David) of Augusta, Mont., Anne (David) of Eugene; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; two sisters; and one brother. There will be memorial service at 1 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020, at Cedar Mill Bible Church, 12208 N.W. Cornell Road, Portland, OR 97229. Please sign the online guest book at www.oregonlive.com/obits
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In memory of
Barrie Gilbert
Barrie Gilbert June 5, 1937 - Jan. 30, 2020 Barrie Gilbert of Beaverton died Jan. 30, 2020 at St. Vincent Hospital from a traumatic brain injury following a fall at home. Barrie was born June 5, 1937, to Fredrick Arthur and Edith (Tansley) Gilbert in Bournemouth, Dorset, England. His father died in a bombing attack when Barrie was three years old. By age 9, he had started experimenting with electronic circuits. Oscilloscopes had a special fascination to him. At 17 he had his first job in electronics and later studied physics at Bournemouth College. While working at Mullard in 1959 he saw a Tektronix oscilloscope for the first time. He was inspired to design his own oscilloscope which led him to a job at Tektronix in Oregon. He became a very creative circuit designer. In December 1968 he astonished the electronics community with two groundbreaking articles in one issue of the prestigious IEEE Journal. The subject of the two articles became known as the Translinear Principle. He moved back to England to care for his aging mother for seven years until her death. While in England Barrie worked with Analog Devices of Norwood, Mass. When he returned to the United States in 1977 he rejoined Tektronix out of his love for Oregon as much as for Tektronix. Analog Devices found him so valuable that it was willing to create a laboratory for Barrie in Oregon where his creativity exploded contributing to Analog Device's rapid growth. Since then Analog Devices NW Labs has grown to 21 employees and Barrie Gilbert has become one of the most famous analog circuit designers in the world. Barrie met his future wife, Alicia Moore, at an electronics conference in 1988 and they were married May 6, 1990. Barrie's prolific career earned him the Fall 2007 cover and two thirds of the prestigious IEEE Solid State Circuits News. He has been granted 109 U.S. Patents, numerous accolades and awards including an honorary PhD from Oregon State University. Barrie rearranged sonatas for orchestra or wind ensemble on his synthesizers, wrote poetry and had a collection of museum-class electronics. Barrie is survived by his wife of 30 years, Alicia; former wife, Myrna; four children, David (Wanda) of Gaston, Timothy of Bend, Lynn (David) of Augusta, Mont., Anne (David) of Eugene; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; two sisters; and one brother. There will be memorial service at 1 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020, at Cedar Mill Bible Church, 12208 N.W. Cornell Road, Portland, OR 97229. Please sign the online guest book at www.oregonlive.com/obits
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