In memory of
George Dawson Halsey Jr.
In memory of
George Dawson Halsey Jr.
George Dawson Halsey Jr. George Dawson Halsey Jr., 90, died in Seattle, WA, on January 15, 2016. A well-known figure around the University District, he always rode his bike to work at the University of Washington, where he was a professor in the Department of Chemistry. He ate lunch every day with a group of friends at the Faculty Club, where the table was never too small to accommodate another person. Born May 28, 1925, in Washington, D.C., he moved to Pelham, NY, while still a young child. He would fondly recount stories of trips into the City with his mother. There he developed many of the enthusiasms for which he was known-music, architecture, art, and literature. He also loved trains, and kept schedules and maps of long-gone train companies and routes. During the Depression, his family moved to Columbia, SC. Despite his reluctance to leave New York, he was in many ways a Southerner. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of South Carolina in 1943, received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1948, and was a Junior Fellow at Harvard University from 1948 until 1951, leaving to become a professor at the University of Washington. In 1955 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. His textbook Physical Chemistry, written with three colleagues was published in 1964. In 1965 he received the Kendall Company Award in Colloid Chemistry by the American Chemical Society. He retired as professor emeritus in 1993. He is survived by the mother of his three children, Yadviga; his children, Bill, Julia Baker, and Sarah; four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His family requests that donations be made to Music4Life.org . Please sign George's online Guestbook at www.Legacy.com .
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In memory of
George Dawson Halsey Jr.
George Dawson Halsey Jr. George Dawson Halsey Jr., 90, died in Seattle, WA, on January 15, 2016. A well-known figure around the University District, he always rode his bike to work at the University of Washington, where he was a professor in the Department of Chemistry. He ate lunch every day with a group of friends at the Faculty Club, where the table was never too small to accommodate another person. Born May 28, 1925, in Washington, D.C., he moved to Pelham, NY, while still a young child. He would fondly recount stories of trips into the City with his mother. There he developed many of the enthusiasms for which he was known-music, architecture, art, and literature. He also loved trains, and kept schedules and maps of long-gone train companies and routes. During the Depression, his family moved to Columbia, SC. Despite his reluctance to leave New York, he was in many ways a Southerner. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of South Carolina in 1943, received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1948, and was a Junior Fellow at Harvard University from 1948 until 1951, leaving to become a professor at the University of Washington. In 1955 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. His textbook Physical Chemistry, written with three colleagues was published in 1964. In 1965 he received the Kendall Company Award in Colloid Chemistry by the American Chemical Society. He retired as professor emeritus in 1993. He is survived by the mother of his three children, Yadviga; his children, Bill, Julia Baker, and Sarah; four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His family requests that donations be made to Music4Life.org . Please sign George's online Guestbook at www.Legacy.com .
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