In memory of
Doctor Peyton Edwin Weary
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In memory of
Doctor Peyton Edwin Weary
Peyton Edwin Weary Peyton Edwin Weary, 79, died suddenly of cardiac arrest on Friday, June 26, 2009, at home in Charlottesville, Virginia. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Janet Gregory Weary; daughters, Terry Melton and her husband, Robert, of State College, Pennsylvania, Conway Weary of Asheville, North Carolina, and Carolyn Brandt and her husband, Mark, of Crozet, Virginia; sister, Leslie Weary Lillis Paul of Winona Lake, Indiana; seven grandchildren, Kathleen and John Melton, Charlotte, Samuel, and Lindsey Taylor, and Martin and Peyton Brandt and one great-granddaughter, Maya McDermott. He was pre-deceased by a sister, Catherine Weary Fiutko; and an infant son, Lewis Peyton. Doctor Weary was born in Evanston, Illinois, and was a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, to which he gave credit for establishing his life's values, Princeton University, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He served in the United States Army as a Captain from 1956 until1958. Doctor Weary was a Professor of Dermatology at the University of Virginia, serving from 1958 until 1999; he was Chairman of the Department of Dermatology from 1976 until 1993, and retired with the title of Emeritus Professor of Dermatology. He held the Edward P. Cawley Chair in Dermatology from the University of Virginia. Among his many accomplishments, between 1964 and 1976, he organized and served as Chairman of the first year long Senior Medical Student Elective Program in the United States. Between 1969 and 1994, he conducted 35 local and regional skin cancer screening clinics which were the first to be held in the United States and he was instrumental in establishing the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) sponsorship of nationwide screening clinics that have occurred yearly since 1985 with over one million individuals seen since inception of the program. From 1972 until 1975, he served as Chairman of the Council of the National Program for Dermatology which helped restructure the American Academy of Dermatology, create a central office, establish a governmental liaison function and lay the foundation for Academy activities. From 1975 until 1982, Doctor Weary chaired the American Academy Dermatology Council on Government Liaison and presented testimony before various Congressional and Agency committees on more than 50 occasions. In 1978 until 1979, he served as a member of an Food and Drug Administration Interagency Task Force and was instrumental in the creation of The Orphan Drug Legislation of 1983. From 1982 until 1990, Doctor Weary served as a trustee of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates and served on the organizing committee for the International Medical Scholarship Program. In 1984, he created the Academic Medical Center Preceptorship Program for Congressional Health Legislative Assistants and other governmental agency personnel, to orient them to the structure and function of academic medical centers. From 1985 until 1990, he assisted in the creation of the Coalition of Patient Advocates for Skin Disease Research. Doctor Weary held many high offices in his profession and received numerous awards for his public service. Among other things, he served as President of the American Board of Medical Specialties from 1990 until 1992, which during his tenure promulgated standards for all medical specialties; President of the American Dermatological Association from 1992 until 1993; President of the American Academy of Dermatology from 1994 until 1995; and President of the National Association of Physicians for the Environment from 1994 until 1997. He was awarded the American Academy Dermatology Gold Medal in 1990, the Academy's highest award. He also received the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the EPA in 1995, the Walter Reed Distinguished Achievement Award in 2001, University of Virginia Medical Alumni Association, Community Service Award in 2001, Medical Society of Virginia, The Emily Couric Community Advocacy Award in 2004, and The Elizabeth Scott Leadership Award in 2005, The Miller Center for Public Affairs. Although Doctor Weary was an outstanding contributor nationally and internationally during his professional career, he was most proud of activities he engaged in during his retirement. In particular, he helped to enroll children in the Children's Medical Insurance Program, helped to establish the Community Children's Dental Center, and volunteered as a care provider in the Charlottesville Free Clinic. He enjoyed his involvement with the Miller Center for Public Affairs. He spent many happy and productive hours helping to educate the public about the impact of the environment on health. Doctor Weary enjoyed the love and caring support of myriad friends and, of course, his family. He will be remembered for his courage, especially toward the end of his life - when he never failed to see the glass as "half full", his soft heart for anyone in need, his care of his family, his quirky sense of humor, and his desire to leave the world a much better place than he found it. His passionate hope was that medical care will continue to be practiced faithfully and responsibly, and that those who follow will protect the earth and the skies above it for future generations. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that charitable donations be made to F.I.R.S.T. Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types, 1364 Welsh Road G2, North Wales, PA 19454; the Community Children's Dental Center www.cadakids.org ; The Miller Center for Public Affairs, or a charity of the giver's choice. A memorial service for Doctor Weary is scheduled 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 1, 2009, at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 190 Rugby Road, Charlottesville, Virginia. This obituary was originally published in the Daily Progress.
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In memory of
Doctor Peyton Edwin Weary
Peyton Edwin Weary Peyton Edwin Weary, 79, died suddenly of cardiac arrest on Friday, June 26, 2009, at home in Charlottesville, Virginia. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Janet Gregory Weary; daughters, Terry Melton and her husband, Robert, of State College, Pennsylvania, Conway Weary of Asheville, North Carolina, and Carolyn Brandt and her husband, Mark, of Crozet, Virginia; sister, Leslie Weary Lillis Paul of Winona Lake, Indiana; seven grandchildren, Kathleen and John Melton, Charlotte, Samuel, and Lindsey Taylor, and Martin and Peyton Brandt and one great-granddaughter, Maya McDermott. He was pre-deceased by a sister, Catherine Weary Fiutko; and an infant son, Lewis Peyton. Doctor Weary was born in Evanston, Illinois, and was a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, to which he gave credit for establishing his life's values, Princeton University, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He served in the United States Army as a Captain from 1956 until1958. Doctor Weary was a Professor of Dermatology at the University of Virginia, serving from 1958 until 1999; he was Chairman of the Department of Dermatology from 1976 until 1993, and retired with the title of Emeritus Professor of Dermatology. He held the Edward P. Cawley Chair in Dermatology from the University of Virginia. Among his many accomplishments, between 1964 and 1976, he organized and served as Chairman of the first year long Senior Medical Student Elective Program in the United States. Between 1969 and 1994, he conducted 35 local and regional skin cancer screening clinics which were the first to be held in the United States and he was instrumental in establishing the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) sponsorship of nationwide screening clinics that have occurred yearly since 1985 with over one million individuals seen since inception of the program. From 1972 until 1975, he served as Chairman of the Council of the National Program for Dermatology which helped restructure the American Academy of Dermatology, create a central office, establish a governmental liaison function and lay the foundation for Academy activities. From 1975 until 1982, Doctor Weary chaired the American Academy Dermatology Council on Government Liaison and presented testimony before various Congressional and Agency committees on more than 50 occasions. In 1978 until 1979, he served as a member of an Food and Drug Administration Interagency Task Force and was instrumental in the creation of The Orphan Drug Legislation of 1983. From 1982 until 1990, Doctor Weary served as a trustee of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates and served on the organizing committee for the International Medical Scholarship Program. In 1984, he created the Academic Medical Center Preceptorship Program for Congressional Health Legislative Assistants and other governmental agency personnel, to orient them to the structure and function of academic medical centers. From 1985 until 1990, he assisted in the creation of the Coalition of Patient Advocates for Skin Disease Research. Doctor Weary held many high offices in his profession and received numerous awards for his public service. Among other things, he served as President of the American Board of Medical Specialties from 1990 until 1992, which during his tenure promulgated standards for all medical specialties; President of the American Dermatological Association from 1992 until 1993; President of the American Academy of Dermatology from 1994 until 1995; and President of the National Association of Physicians for the Environment from 1994 until 1997. He was awarded the American Academy Dermatology Gold Medal in 1990, the Academy's highest award. He also received the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the EPA in 1995, the Walter Reed Distinguished Achievement Award in 2001, University of Virginia Medical Alumni Association, Community Service Award in 2001, Medical Society of Virginia, The Emily Couric Community Advocacy Award in 2004, and The Elizabeth Scott Leadership Award in 2005, The Miller Center for Public Affairs. Although Doctor Weary was an outstanding contributor nationally and internationally during his professional career, he was most proud of activities he engaged in during his retirement. In particular, he helped to enroll children in the Children's Medical Insurance Program, helped to establish the Community Children's Dental Center, and volunteered as a care provider in the Charlottesville Free Clinic. He enjoyed his involvement with the Miller Center for Public Affairs. He spent many happy and productive hours helping to educate the public about the impact of the environment on health. Doctor Weary enjoyed the love and caring support of myriad friends and, of course, his family. He will be remembered for his courage, especially toward the end of his life - when he never failed to see the glass as "half full", his soft heart for anyone in need, his care of his family, his quirky sense of humor, and his desire to leave the world a much better place than he found it. His passionate hope was that medical care will continue to be practiced faithfully and responsibly, and that those who follow will protect the earth and the skies above it for future generations. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that charitable donations be made to F.I.R.S.T. Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types, 1364 Welsh Road G2, North Wales, PA 19454; the Community Children's Dental Center www.cadakids.org ; The Miller Center for Public Affairs, or a charity of the giver's choice. A memorial service for Doctor Weary is scheduled 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 1, 2009, at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 190 Rugby Road, Charlottesville, Virginia. This obituary was originally published in the Daily Progress.
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