In memory of
Joseph Cherry, Jr.
In memory of
Joseph Cherry, Jr.
Joseph Cherry Jr. was born on June 10th, 1940 in Windsor, North Carolina. He was the first of two children of Martha and Joseph Cherry Sr. His younger sister Katherine, was born 3 years later. AS A YOUTH As a young child Joseph learned the ethics of hard work while being raised on a farm by his grandparents, Clara and Willie Frank Smallwood. He grew up amongst his aunts and uncles, who were so close in age, they were more like siblings. So close that they were nursed at the same time, from the very same bosom. Joseph loved his family. His grandmother, Clara, was a seamstress and made all of their clothes. He liked playing his grandfather's organ and had a joy for riding horses. Joseph cultivated many skills on the farm, including growing peanuts, corn, and cotton. Cotton and peanuts were a main source of income. He worked in gardens of beans, peas, sweet potatoes, cabbage, and rutabaga. Waking as early as 6am for work, Joseph, his sister, Katherine, and his Aunt Doris and Aunt Sadie would pick cucumbers; filling graner bags until they were three feet high. That was how they learned to earn their first wages. The bags were collected, each bearing their names, and the collector would return that same Friday or Saturday to take the next batch of bags and pay them each about $0.75 - $1.50, each week. Joseph was able to enjoy buying his own lunch and snacks. Sodas of 5 cents, sour pickles for 10 cents, and some cheese and crackers for 15 cents. Enjoying an entire lunch for a quarter. Other farm duties kept Joseph busy. He used one of the family mules to do farm work and was also responsible for feeding hay to the mules and horses, and making slop for the pigs. He would also spend time pumping water into containers that sat until the iron settled before use. In preparation for the winter, he and his aunts and uncles would make a hill shaped mound which resembled an igloo, where they packed in veggies to last the season. To retrieve sweet potatoes, a hole had been dug at the top of the mound. So one would only have to stick their hand in to get what was needed. Their family farm had two large oak trees, with a swing and chairs. Joseph would gather beneath the trees with family and share apples with his neighbors. Clara and Willie Frank had an apple orchard on the farm, with apple, pear, and peach trees, and gladly shared the abundance of apples. Joseph’s uncle, Willie Frank, owned a shop that housed a pool table and piccolo. His aunts recall them climbing through the window to shoot pool, dance, and figured out how to rig the piccolo with a clothing hanger to play music for free. On holidays, he would attend baseball games. The community really came together. In addition to the games were people cooking out, selling hot dogs, ice cream and selling homemade cakes. Even photostations were set up for those who wanted to pay for a picture. At the age of 12, Joseph was baptized at Indian Woods Church, where he had learned to have faith in the Lord. Joseph attended Kings Schoolhouse as a youth and finished his early education at Indian Woods Schoolhouse. In the mornings, he would stop on his mile long walk to school to visit his grandmother Cherry, who would give him a hot biscuit in a brown paper bag. His journeys home were filled with fist fights against excited classmates after being released from a long day at the schoolhouse. . MIGRATING TO PHILADELPHIA While Joseph and his younger sister Katherine were coming up on the farm, his mother, Martha and her sister, Clara, ventured north to establish a better life in Philadelphia. Joseph migrated up to Philadelphia to reunite with his mother and to continue his schooling. He attended the Philadelphia Public School system and graduated from Simon Gratz High School in 1959. On his first day of his junior year, he met Dan Mosley, who would be his best friend for the rest of his life. Dan had told Joseph, “Friends are not made, they are discovered”. They ran cross country at school and had a good time roller skating and bowling together. At a time, they even got together in Fairmount Park and drag raced each other for fun. Joseph liked live entertainment and a favorite spot was the Latin Casino. He and Dan ventured out one evening and had reserved seats in the front row to see Isaac Hayes and Al Green. Joseph spent quality time with his mother, Martha, who had become a beautician, and his sister, and aunts and uncles. They would anticipate his mother's fried chicken, but she liked to wash her chicken multiple times, and by the time she had finished, Joseph, Katherine, and their aunts had already gone around the corner for a hoagie. Joseph loved family time, he also loved to dance and would go out to the local cabarets with his cousins to have a good time. He and his Aunt Doris even went to see Ray Charles in New Jersey, with seats in the very front row. THE PURSUIT OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP Joseph would one day tell his second son, “Don’t be scared of hard work, hard work is good for you.” For his entire life, Joseph had a desire to work hard, save, and invest. One of his first jobs was shining shoes on 40th street in West Philadelphia. While shining shoes, he gained employment at Boots Bottling Company, where his Uncle, Paul Jones also worked. Shortly after, Joseph sought training and obtained a license to barber hair, in 1969. He soon found it challenging to enter a shop without a sponsor and after securing a spot for some time, quickly lost interest in barbering; telling one of his aunts jokingly, “These ugly people want you to make them pretty”. While attending OIC, Opportunities Industrialization Center, Joseph gleaned knowledge to repair air conditioners and refrigerators. With these various jobs, he saved money to invest in real estate and began developing homes throughout the city. While his aptitude for entrepreneurship grew, he secured a job with SEPTA, in 1972. There, he worked as hard as two men, driving buses overtime and simultaneously developing homes. FAMILY LIFE “Boy, you can’t hate the snow, the Lord made the snow and you can’t hate something that God made” Joseph said to his son during a blizzard. During the mid 60’s Joseph married Anne, the daughter of a reverend, and together, in 1967, their son, Joseph III, was born. They moved to Mt. Airy with their new family. While a young boy, Joey was never allowed to run away from a fight, Joseph would stand in the doorway, making sure his son always stood his ground. Short years later Joseph and Anne decided to separate, and subsequently ended their marriage. One day while employed with Septa, Joseph had gotten called in for overtime on an off day. With an “out of service” bus and light snow on the ground, he headed to the beginning of his route. On his way up Broad Street, he stopped for a woman who resembled his grandmother, Clara. At this time, a young woman ran across the street and jumped on the bus. After the elderly lady got off, Joseph struck up a conversation with the woman and learned they both had family from North Carolina. Her name was Yvette Foye, and that day she got to work right on time and at that moment she decided not to change the last digit of her phone number when Joseph asked if he could give her a call. Joseph and Yvette began dating and had their very first date at the Latin Casino with a live performance. They enjoyed many live shows together, seeing Lou Rawls, Gladys Knight, Diana Ross, and other prominent performers. Since Joseph had such a close relationship with his family, Yvette soon met them. One day, they went to pick up his grandmother Clara at his Aunt Ruth's house. When Aunt Ruth opened the door, she immediately recognized Yvette. Yvette and her sister, Gina, were already friends of the family. Numerous trips were taken to North Carolina, since both of them had family there. They would visit his family in Windsor and then her family in Goldsboro. Two years after meeting, they welcomed their first son, Leonard, in 1978. Joseph continued working long hours and Yvette was a dedicated student, but they still found time for family. As a small child, Leonard would join his father on the bus and ride around with him as he worked. Joseph would go to pro basketball games with his oldest son, Joey, who also liked going to the YMCA with his friends. One time Joseph and Joey had missed a train while heading down to the sports complex for a 76ers game. They ran all the way from Broad and Olney to catch the train at Broad and Logan in order to be on time. Joseph loved running and racing with his kids, yet also enjoyed relaxing and watching TV with his sons, Joey and Leonard. Bonanza, Dallas, and Matlock were among his favorites. While caring for their family, Joseph and Yvette continued to scout homes during their free time, with the goal to acquire and develop new properties. On June 1st, 1985, Joseph Cherry Jr. and Yvette Foye, were married at the West Oak Lane Church of God. In February of the following year, 1986, they welcomed another baby boy, Keith. Their family grew quickly, and in 1987, on Joseph’s birthday, their first daughter, Janene, was born. With their desire to have a large family, they sought another home. Joseph searched adamantly until he found a developing community on the outskirts of Philadelphia. He didn't stop until the developers had built the home that they wanted. In 1989, Joseph and Yvette moved their family into their new home. During the summer of 1989, their youngest daughter, Christine was born, always affectionately called, “Sweet Baby” by her father. Joseph was a devout family man. In spite of working throughout the nights to the mid day, he would pack his children in the back of his Plymouth Acclaim and take them with him around the city as he handled his business. He would sing to them, many times inserting his name into the lyrics or making up his own lyrics entirely. His children remember fondly, receiving calls from pay phones. He would check in and ask if they needed anything. They would take turns talking into the receiver, rattling off their favorite snacks and requests for him to bring home. He would march in the house in his Septa uniform with large pizzas, Pepsi, and Snickers. Whenever he could, Joseph would fire up one of his many grills and bbq for his family and friends, oftentimes cooking the red meat until it was completely well done. Joseph loved hosting cookouts and being at celebrations, including family reunions, birthdays, and weddings. Sundays were spent watching football with his sons. Many afternoons, when his youngest children arrived home, he would cut a watermelon in fourths, placing the large pieces on the family table, no plate needed. On Fridays, he would take a short adventure with Keith, Janene, and Christine, to the ”Candy store”, Clemens supermarket, up the street from their home. They would pick out bags of candy for their own personal consumption, since Joseph hated when they bickered over sharing. Joseph doted on his children and loved carrying them whenever he could, even when they grew quite large. Joseph and Yvette had groomed their children in small ways to help with the family business. Phone etiquette was imperative to screen people calling about various properties. Each ounce of guidance was to have their children gain confidence and independence. Directing them to stand up straight in any situation. He instilled his family values on his sons, with his blunt, straightforward advice, and guidance. Telling them and showing them how to provide and protect their own families. Joseph had always been serious about hard work and was relentless on Leonard while he caddied at a golfing club near the family home. Even if the schools were off, Leonard was not, and was awakened to arrive at work before it had even opened. He always affirmed the classic phrase, “The early bird catches the worm.” Never wanting to miss a chance to get the most out of a new day. LEGACY Joseph’s belief and trust in Jesus strengthened and restored him. He was a thankful man who seldom complained, even amidst health challenges. Joseph had a vision for his life and legacy. He wanted his children to be disciplined and learn the traits of self respect and reliance. To receive a good education and to value family over everything. He strove with all his might to create the life that he envisioned for himself. Being the best family man, showing his family the most incredible Christmases and Birthdays. Everything he dreamed of came true. The prime example of a job well done. Joseph always wanted a large family and his greatest joy was to always be surrounded by those that he loved. Joseph Cherry Jr. is preceded in death by his mother, Martha Cherry Truesdale, father, Joseph Cherry Sr, and sister, Katherine Cherry. is survived by his beloved wife, Yvette and five children. Joseph III, Leonard, Keith, Janene, and Christine. Along with his grandchildren, Jasmine, Sanaa, Damon, London, Bilon, Lauren, soon arriving Meadow, and first grandson Isaiah Joseph. He also leaves behind a host of aunts, cousins, nieces and nephews, friends, and in-laws, and mother in-law, Jean Foye. AWARDS and ACHIEVEMENTS Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of State- State Board of Barbers (1969) Southeastern PA Transportation Authority- Safety Achievement Award (1997) Southeastern PA Transportation Authority- Certificate of Merit for 25 Years of Service (1997) IREM Institute of Real Estate Management- Certified Property Manager (2005)
View Full Obituary ›
Services Provided By
Beckett-Brown & Hodges Funeral Home - Philadelphia
5618 Baynton St
Philadelphia, PA 19144
In memory of
Joseph Cherry, Jr.
Joseph Cherry Jr. was born on June 10th, 1940 in Windsor, North Carolina. He was the first of two children of Martha and Joseph Cherry Sr. His younger sister Katherine, was born 3 years later. AS A YOUTH As a young child Joseph learned the ethics of hard work while being raised on a farm by his grandparents, Clara and Willie Frank Smallwood. He grew up amongst his aunts and uncles, who were so close in age, they were more like siblings. So close that they were nursed at the same time, from the very same bosom. Joseph loved his family. His grandmother, Clara, was a seamstress and made all of their clothes. He liked playing his grandfather's organ and had a joy for riding horses. Joseph cultivated many skills on the farm, including growing peanuts, corn, and cotton. Cotton and peanuts were a main source of income. He worked in gardens of beans, peas, sweet potatoes, cabbage, and rutabaga. Waking as early as 6am for work, Joseph, his sister, Katherine, and his Aunt Doris and Aunt Sadie would pick cucumbers; filling graner bags until they were three feet high. That was how they learned to earn their first wages. The bags were collected, each bearing their names, and the collector would return that same Friday or Saturday to take the next batch of bags and pay them each about $0.75 - $1.50, each week. Joseph was able to enjoy buying his own lunch and snacks. Sodas of 5 cents, sour pickles for 10 cents, and some cheese and crackers for 15 cents. Enjoying an entire lunch for a quarter. Other farm duties kept Joseph busy. He used one of the family mules to do farm work and was also responsible for feeding hay to the mules and horses, and making slop for the pigs. He would also spend time pumping water into containers that sat until the iron settled before use. In preparation for the winter, he and his aunts and uncles would make a hill shaped mound which resembled an igloo, where they packed in veggies to last the season. To retrieve sweet potatoes, a hole had been dug at the top of the mound. So one would only have to stick their hand in to get what was needed. Their family farm had two large oak trees, with a swing and chairs. Joseph would gather beneath the trees with family and share apples with his neighbors. Clara and Willie Frank had an apple orchard on the farm, with apple, pear, and peach trees, and gladly shared the abundance of apples. Joseph’s uncle, Willie Frank, owned a shop that housed a pool table and piccolo. His aunts recall them climbing through the window to shoot pool, dance, and figured out how to rig the piccolo with a clothing hanger to play music for free. On holidays, he would attend baseball games. The community really came together. In addition to the games were people cooking out, selling hot dogs, ice cream and selling homemade cakes. Even photostations were set up for those who wanted to pay for a picture. At the age of 12, Joseph was baptized at Indian Woods Church, where he had learned to have faith in the Lord. Joseph attended Kings Schoolhouse as a youth and finished his early education at Indian Woods Schoolhouse. In the mornings, he would stop on his mile long walk to school to visit his grandmother Cherry, who would give him a hot biscuit in a brown paper bag. His journeys home were filled with fist fights against excited classmates after being released from a long day at the schoolhouse. . MIGRATING TO PHILADELPHIA While Joseph and his younger sister Katherine were coming up on the farm, his mother, Martha and her sister, Clara, ventured north to establish a better life in Philadelphia. Joseph migrated up to Philadelphia to reunite with his mother and to continue his schooling. He attended the Philadelphia Public School system and graduated from Simon Gratz High School in 1959. On his first day of his junior year, he met Dan Mosley, who would be his best friend for the rest of his life. Dan had told Joseph, “Friends are not made, they are discovered”. They ran cross country at school and had a good time roller skating and bowling together. At a time, they even got together in Fairmount Park and drag raced each other for fun. Joseph liked live entertainment and a favorite spot was the Latin Casino. He and Dan ventured out one evening and had reserved seats in the front row to see Isaac Hayes and Al Green. Joseph spent quality time with his mother, Martha, who had become a beautician, and his sister, and aunts and uncles. They would anticipate his mother's fried chicken, but she liked to wash her chicken multiple times, and by the time she had finished, Joseph, Katherine, and their aunts had already gone around the corner for a hoagie. Joseph loved family time, he also loved to dance and would go out to the local cabarets with his cousins to have a good time. He and his Aunt Doris even went to see Ray Charles in New Jersey, with seats in the very front row. THE PURSUIT OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP Joseph would one day tell his second son, “Don’t be scared of hard work, hard work is good for you.” For his entire life, Joseph had a desire to work hard, save, and invest. One of his first jobs was shining shoes on 40th street in West Philadelphia. While shining shoes, he gained employment at Boots Bottling Company, where his Uncle, Paul Jones also worked. Shortly after, Joseph sought training and obtained a license to barber hair, in 1969. He soon found it challenging to enter a shop without a sponsor and after securing a spot for some time, quickly lost interest in barbering; telling one of his aunts jokingly, “These ugly people want you to make them pretty”. While attending OIC, Opportunities Industrialization Center, Joseph gleaned knowledge to repair air conditioners and refrigerators. With these various jobs, he saved money to invest in real estate and began developing homes throughout the city. While his aptitude for entrepreneurship grew, he secured a job with SEPTA, in 1972. There, he worked as hard as two men, driving buses overtime and simultaneously developing homes. FAMILY LIFE “Boy, you can’t hate the snow, the Lord made the snow and you can’t hate something that God made” Joseph said to his son during a blizzard. During the mid 60’s Joseph married Anne, the daughter of a reverend, and together, in 1967, their son, Joseph III, was born. They moved to Mt. Airy with their new family. While a young boy, Joey was never allowed to run away from a fight, Joseph would stand in the doorway, making sure his son always stood his ground. Short years later Joseph and Anne decided to separate, and subsequently ended their marriage. One day while employed with Septa, Joseph had gotten called in for overtime on an off day. With an “out of service” bus and light snow on the ground, he headed to the beginning of his route. On his way up Broad Street, he stopped for a woman who resembled his grandmother, Clara. At this time, a young woman ran across the street and jumped on the bus. After the elderly lady got off, Joseph struck up a conversation with the woman and learned they both had family from North Carolina. Her name was Yvette Foye, and that day she got to work right on time and at that moment she decided not to change the last digit of her phone number when Joseph asked if he could give her a call. Joseph and Yvette began dating and had their very first date at the Latin Casino with a live performance. They enjoyed many live shows together, seeing Lou Rawls, Gladys Knight, Diana Ross, and other prominent performers. Since Joseph had such a close relationship with his family, Yvette soon met them. One day, they went to pick up his grandmother Clara at his Aunt Ruth's house. When Aunt Ruth opened the door, she immediately recognized Yvette. Yvette and her sister, Gina, were already friends of the family. Numerous trips were taken to North Carolina, since both of them had family there. They would visit his family in Windsor and then her family in Goldsboro. Two years after meeting, they welcomed their first son, Leonard, in 1978. Joseph continued working long hours and Yvette was a dedicated student, but they still found time for family. As a small child, Leonard would join his father on the bus and ride around with him as he worked. Joseph would go to pro basketball games with his oldest son, Joey, who also liked going to the YMCA with his friends. One time Joseph and Joey had missed a train while heading down to the sports complex for a 76ers game. They ran all the way from Broad and Olney to catch the train at Broad and Logan in order to be on time. Joseph loved running and racing with his kids, yet also enjoyed relaxing and watching TV with his sons, Joey and Leonard. Bonanza, Dallas, and Matlock were among his favorites. While caring for their family, Joseph and Yvette continued to scout homes during their free time, with the goal to acquire and develop new properties. On June 1st, 1985, Joseph Cherry Jr. and Yvette Foye, were married at the West Oak Lane Church of God. In February of the following year, 1986, they welcomed another baby boy, Keith. Their family grew quickly, and in 1987, on Joseph’s birthday, their first daughter, Janene, was born. With their desire to have a large family, they sought another home. Joseph searched adamantly until he found a developing community on the outskirts of Philadelphia. He didn't stop until the developers had built the home that they wanted. In 1989, Joseph and Yvette moved their family into their new home. During the summer of 1989, their youngest daughter, Christine was born, always affectionately called, “Sweet Baby” by her father. Joseph was a devout family man. In spite of working throughout the nights to the mid day, he would pack his children in the back of his Plymouth Acclaim and take them with him around the city as he handled his business. He would sing to them, many times inserting his name into the lyrics or making up his own lyrics entirely. His children remember fondly, receiving calls from pay phones. He would check in and ask if they needed anything. They would take turns talking into the receiver, rattling off their favorite snacks and requests for him to bring home. He would march in the house in his Septa uniform with large pizzas, Pepsi, and Snickers. Whenever he could, Joseph would fire up one of his many grills and bbq for his family and friends, oftentimes cooking the red meat until it was completely well done. Joseph loved hosting cookouts and being at celebrations, including family reunions, birthdays, and weddings. Sundays were spent watching football with his sons. Many afternoons, when his youngest children arrived home, he would cut a watermelon in fourths, placing the large pieces on the family table, no plate needed. On Fridays, he would take a short adventure with Keith, Janene, and Christine, to the ”Candy store”, Clemens supermarket, up the street from their home. They would pick out bags of candy for their own personal consumption, since Joseph hated when they bickered over sharing. Joseph doted on his children and loved carrying them whenever he could, even when they grew quite large. Joseph and Yvette had groomed their children in small ways to help with the family business. Phone etiquette was imperative to screen people calling about various properties. Each ounce of guidance was to have their children gain confidence and independence. Directing them to stand up straight in any situation. He instilled his family values on his sons, with his blunt, straightforward advice, and guidance. Telling them and showing them how to provide and protect their own families. Joseph had always been serious about hard work and was relentless on Leonard while he caddied at a golfing club near the family home. Even if the schools were off, Leonard was not, and was awakened to arrive at work before it had even opened. He always affirmed the classic phrase, “The early bird catches the worm.” Never wanting to miss a chance to get the most out of a new day. LEGACY Joseph’s belief and trust in Jesus strengthened and restored him. He was a thankful man who seldom complained, even amidst health challenges. Joseph had a vision for his life and legacy. He wanted his children to be disciplined and learn the traits of self respect and reliance. To receive a good education and to value family over everything. He strove with all his might to create the life that he envisioned for himself. Being the best family man, showing his family the most incredible Christmases and Birthdays. Everything he dreamed of came true. The prime example of a job well done. Joseph always wanted a large family and his greatest joy was to always be surrounded by those that he loved. Joseph Cherry Jr. is preceded in death by his mother, Martha Cherry Truesdale, father, Joseph Cherry Sr, and sister, Katherine Cherry. is survived by his beloved wife, Yvette and five children. Joseph III, Leonard, Keith, Janene, and Christine. Along with his grandchildren, Jasmine, Sanaa, Damon, London, Bilon, Lauren, soon arriving Meadow, and first grandson Isaiah Joseph. He also leaves behind a host of aunts, cousins, nieces and nephews, friends, and in-laws, and mother in-law, Jean Foye. AWARDS and ACHIEVEMENTS Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of State- State Board of Barbers (1969) Southeastern PA Transportation Authority- Safety Achievement Award (1997) Southeastern PA Transportation Authority- Certificate of Merit for 25 Years of Service (1997) IREM Institute of Real Estate Management- Certified Property Manager (2005)
View Full Obituary ›
Services Provided By
Beckett-Brown & Hodges Funeral Home - Philadelphia
5618 Baynton St
Philadelphia, PA 19144
Sort
100% Money Back Guarantee
Need Help? Have Questions?