In memory of
ROBERT ANTHONY (BOB) DAVIS
In memory of
ROBERT ANTHONY (BOB) DAVIS
ROBERT (BOB) ANTHONY DAVIS With love and deep sadness the children of Bob Davis announce that their father passed away peacefully on April 12, 2017, at age 88. Bob was born June 12, 1928, in New Waterford, Cape Breton, NS and was always a proud Caper. He wore the Cape Breton and NS tartans when he died. Bob lived a good and full life, working hard to provide for his family of eight children and their mother Rita (MacDonald). Looking back his children realize, as one once wrote, "we were poor and didn't even know it". He is missed by John (Chris), Eric (Andrea and Tracy (deceased)), Anita (Peter), Murdoch (Michelle), Mary, Carol (Frank), Alice (Steve) and Brenda and by his many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and those who knew him as Uncle Bobby. He also helped raise the children of his second wife Gertrude. Bob was the oldest of 9 siblings. He was predeceased by Billy, Jimmy, Rita, Ursula, Melvin and Lloyd and is survived and mourned by Ray (Delores) and Carmel. He had a special and loving relationship with his mother Mary McCarthy and Grandma McCarthy. Bob started work in the Cape Breton coal mines when barely into his teens. After working in the deeps for more than 10 years, he saw the decline of the mines coming, such that the security of his family was in question. He joined the Army in 1954 to support his growing family and served his country until he left the forces after 12 years. He was a Canadian Legion member and faithfully attended Remembrance Day ceremonies. Military life took him and the family across the country, from CFB Borden to Kingston to Vedder Crossing, near Chilliwack, BC. Bob wore the blue beret of UN peacekeepers in the Mideast twice for a year at a time. As a result he saw much more of the world than a Cape Bretoner of his time ever expected to see, taking advantage of leaves to tour Europe and other parts of the Mideast. The absences got to him though and he left the Army for a more stable family life. He relocated to Toronto in 1966, working for Molson Brewery on Fleet Street until a brewery merger offered him a great early retirement opportunity. Bob was a Renaissance man; more educated than his Grade 8 schooling and later high school correspondence courses would indicate. He was widely read and had a range of interests and self-taught skills. He shared his lifelong love of music with his kids, introducing them to everyone from Bob Dylan to Beethoven and Rod McKuen (and in turn they introduced him to everything from Jimi Hendrix to Billy Bragg). In its random way, the Army decided Bob would be a cook. He took to it enthusiastically and became a chef, producing gourmet meals for senior officers and special events and usually preparing the big family holiday meals and a lot of the family baking and great desserts. He loved cooking for the rest of his life. Bob was well into his 40s when he was introduced to golf by some Molson co-workers. As was his way, he became obsessed with the game. He played it into his 80s, almost scoring his age. He could replay rounds in conversation shot by shot, often years later. His plaque from a hole-in-one at Dentonia Park was cherished, as were hundreds of rounds throughout North America and especially at his beloved Picton Golf & Country Club in Picton, ON, where he spent many years of his retirement. Bob was small in stature but tough and athletic. Medical pros marveled at how he recovered almost 10 years ago from his first stroke and then the second and third, through 2015. Complications from the fourth and fifth eventually slowed him and, finally, led to his death. We have many people to thank for helping Dad through that: the professionals at Toronto East General Hospital, Quinte Health Care in Belleville/Picton, Avondale and Beach Arms Retirement Residences in Toronto, Bridgepoint Health Centre, Erin Mills Lodge and finally Streetsville Care Community, where he passed away. Bob wished for no funeral. He had always wanted to go to university and now he has been accepted to the University of Toronto through its whole body donation program, where he will surely teach the medical students a thing or two. http://anatomy.utoronto.ca/body.htm His children will hold a private celebration of their father's life in the near future. The family requests donations in Bob's memory to the Cape Breton Miners Museum in Glace Bay, NS, through www.canadahelps.org (please include a message or note that your contribution is in Bob Davis's name). Bob was proud of his ancestral mining heritage. He was a grandson of William Davis, a miner killed by company police ("company goons" Bob always called them) during a 1925 strike. Davis Day in Nova Scotia commemorates that incident: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Davis_(miner) Bob always marked Davis Day, June 11th, as a day to honour workers everywhere. In a 1976 letter to his fellow Local 304 Union members, Bob cited this heritage as part of his deep beliefs as an "ardent labour man", proud to have seldom missed a meeting of his brewery workers local and to have taken many Union and college labour courses. Please also view and add to Bob Davis's memory page at: www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/ ... Show More
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